ART LIVES IN OUR CITY

ADVENTURE WORLD ART TRAIL ARTIST FEATURE

JENNIFER GALANIS (CURIE)

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Curie (Jennifer Galanis): "Fault of Our Memory"  AI (Artificial Intelligence) Digital Print  2022

Jennifer Galanis is both a scientist and artist. Jennifer has an extraordinary and wide-ranging approach her art, which includes collaborative painting, where she works on a single canvas with two other artists contributing brushwork and ideas with acrylic paints. As a solo artist, Jennifer produces woodcuts, prints that are made from carvings in wood blocks that are covered in ink and transferred to paper. Jennifer recognizes that Science and Art are intertwined and both disciplines require a great deal of experimentation, testing, theory and study. In her role as a scientist, Jennifer is also testing the limits of artistic expression by programming her Dell computer to create artwork purely driven by what her computer decides should be placed into the composition. Writing the software for "Curie", the AI artist, Jennifer programs her computer to "think" for itself as she tests how far the lines between human creativity and Artificial Intelligence can interweave. What results is fascinating, with beautifully abstracted concepts that are often as lovely as those created by human hands.

"We stand at the cusp of an art revolution, as AI encroaches upon tasks we believed only humans could perform. With a revolution comes challenging new questions: Who is the artist---the human behind the code or the machine who makes its own "decisions"? And how deeply can we really connect with the synthetic worlds produced by machines? These questions fueled many debates between artists Jennifer Galanis and Steven Cushner, her mentor. Written and developed by Jennifer Galanis, Curie emerged as an exploratory AI fusion of art and science.  Recognizing that humans connect with each other through familiarity with the physical world, Curie's core combines various natural processes in physics, chemistry, and biology. Overlaid on this core,  Curie uses methods similar to what artists use to produce art, such as overdrawing, blending, repetition, layering, and editing. The debate between human versus machine continues. But as Curie's artistic skills grow, perhaps her work can help us find answers."

- Jennifer Galanis